Network Rail


Kent proposals considered in Network Rail route study

A number of proposals to develop the rail network serving the South East in the draft Kent Area Route Study that is currently out for consultation. The consultation opened on 14 March 2017 for three months.

Ebbsfleet Southern Link

A scheme has been developed that could provide a connection to Ebbsfleet International from the line that runs from HS1 to Fawkham Junction, which was formerly used by Eurostars to access London Waterloo. It has been recently used to store Eurostars. This proposal would offer an alternative route into Ebbsfleet and a helpful route from south London.

Canterbury Chords

Two chords have been proposed between the Ashford to Canterbury West and Faversham to Canterbury East lines. A western chord in the Chartham area could create a direct route between Faversham and Ashford improving north-south connectivity across Kent. A southern chord could improve network resilience with the exposed railway line between Folkestone and Dover.

New railway stations

A number of railway stations have been noted.

  • Thanet Parkway
  • Camberwell
  • East Brixton
  • Otterpool Park – Garden Town
  • Gillingham Stadium

Addenbrookes could be built without public money

John Laing Infrastructure are working with Network Rail to investigate the feasibility of building the railway station at Addenbrookes. If no major infrastructure works are required to develop the station, it has been suggested that it could be built without public money. It is understood that there are potential timetable implications to deliver this railway station.

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Construction work start triggers Meridian Water railway station

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan visited the Meridian Water regeneration site as construction enabling works formally started on the first 725 new homes and Enfield Council announced a major programme of activity for its flagship £6bn regeneration scheme.

The programme of activity includes the opening of Meridian Water railway station in 2019, which will replace Angel Road station nearby.


Cambridge North 80% complete following Christmas work

Major progress was made over Christmas at the site of the new Cambridge North station, which is now 80% complete, to get it ready for its opening in May this year as part of Network Rail’s Railway Upgrade Plan.

Work took place over the festive period to build platforms, install tracks for a new bay platform and to fit overhead wires.

The footbridge, lift shafts, stairwells and main station building were all built over the course of last year at the site of the new station, which is anticipated to handle 3,000 passenger journeys a day. The new station will alleviate the pressure on the existing Cambridge station, where people currently leave the train in order to travel by other means to the science and business parks.

Helen Warnock, Network Rail’s area director for west Anglia, said: “We used the Christmas period to link the new tracks and signalling equipment to the existing infrastructure, which could only take place while the railway was closed. With only a few more months to go until opening, work is well under way to build a station that will provide an extra link to the north of the city and support the growth of the local economy as part of our Railway Upgrade Plan.”

Once completed, the station will have three platforms, parking for 450 vehicles and 1,000 cycles, and solar panels will provide up to 10% of the station’s power.

The station is due to open in May this year and will serve Cambridge Science Park and the suburb of Chesterton. Funded by the Department for Transport and developed by Network Rail in partnership with Cambridgeshire County Council, Cambridge North station will provide an alternative connection point for commuters in the north east of the city and provide improved access and journey times for passengers.

It is expected that the station will encourage new businesses to the area as well as aid the expansion of existing businesses, and encourage additional employment opportunities. In the meantime, the station will serve staff already working at the Science Park and St John’s Innovation Centre.


Kenilworth opening date delayed

The opening date for the proposed railway station at Kenilworth has been delayed from August 2016 to the timetable change in December 2016 due to delays encountered delivering track and signalling works that will facilitate rail services serving the new railway station. The railway station is expected to be completed by August 2016.

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Transport Scotland increases East Linton and Reston funding offer

Facing increasing criticism from local authorities, the Scottish government has offered an increased funding package for the proposed railway stations at East Linton and Reston.

The offer made will increase the proposed Scottish Government contribution to 60%; this is unprecedented in terms of the Scottish Stations Fund and has never been made in any previous station.

The second option would see the stations’ construction form part of a programme of works within the next Network Rail delivery period, which broadly aims to improve capacity to the east of Edinburgh. In this second option, the councils are not being required to increase the level of funding above that which they have stated is their limit.

Humza Yousaf, Minister for Transport and the Islands said

“The Scottish Government has been a strong supporter of the delivery of Reston and East Linton stations and is keen to work with local authorities to deliver rail infrastructure to meet the needs of their local communities.

“Currently, we fund new stations via the Scottish Stations Fund with central government funding limited to 50%; the balance being matched by contributions from promoters, whether local authorities or private developers.

“Recognising the budgetary pressures facing all parties concerned, I have written to both local authorities outlining my two potential solutions to the current funding shortfall.

“My first option seeks to address the shortfall by increasing the central government contribution to an unprecedented 60%, the second by incorporating the stations within a larger programme of works.

“The second option would see the stations’ construction form part of a programme of works within the next Network Rail delivery period, which broadly aims to improve capacity to the east of Edinburgh. In this second option, the councils are not being required to increase the level of funding above that which they have stated is their limit.

“In both instances, I would also be seeking a long term commitment from each council in respect of improved connectivity. For example, by ensuring appropriate bus services to the station from outlying communities and the provision of suitable interchange facilities to maximise the wider economic and social value of the stations.

“I am pleased to be able to offer these unprecedented solutions to allow the construction of these stations to progress. I’ve advised the councils that I’m happy to accept either option. The ball is now in the Councils’ court and I look forward, in due course, to hear how they wish to proceed.”