South East


Brent Cross proposal accelerated

A plan for a proposed railway station on the Midland Mainline and Thameslink could be brought forward to a 2022 opening date as part of plans to accelerate rail proposals supporting the Brent Cross Cricklewood development. A consultation into the plans has been opened before an application is submitted to revise the phases of the development.

Source: Barnet Council

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Kent proposals considered in Network Rail route study

A number of proposals to develop the rail network serving the South East in the draft Kent Area Route Study that is currently out for consultation. The consultation opened on 14 March 2017 for three months.

Ebbsfleet Southern Link

A scheme has been developed that could provide a connection to Ebbsfleet International from the line that runs from HS1 to Fawkham Junction, which was formerly used by Eurostars to access London Waterloo. It has been recently used to store Eurostars. This proposal would offer an alternative route into Ebbsfleet and a helpful route from south London.

Canterbury Chords

Two chords have been proposed between the Ashford to Canterbury West and Faversham to Canterbury East lines. A western chord in the Chartham area could create a direct route between Faversham and Ashford improving north-south connectivity across Kent. A southern chord could improve network resilience with the exposed railway line between Folkestone and Dover.

New railway stations

A number of railway stations have been noted.

  • Thanet Parkway
  • Camberwell
  • East Brixton
  • Otterpool Park – Garden Town
  • Gillingham Stadium

London Assembly passes Crossrail 2 motion

The London Assembly has agreed a unanimous motion asking for the Secretary of State for Transport to approve TfL’s Strategic Outline Business Case for Crossrail 2.

The full text of the Motion is:

“This Assembly notes that on 6th March 2017 Transport for London submitted its Strategic Outline Business Case for Crossrail 2 to the Department for Transport.    This Assembly notes the project has the backing of the independent National Infrastructure Commission, 83% of London businesses and councils across the South East.  This Assembly further notes that investing in infrastructure is one of the 10 pillars of the Government’s Modern Industrial Strategy.

This Assembly notes the importance of ensuring the project is approved quickly.  TfL modelling shows that the Capital’s transport network will grind to a halt without the project.   Furthermore, this Assembly notes that without Crossrail 2, at least 17 Underground stations will buckle under crowding pressures and thousands of passengers arriving at Euston on HS2 Phase 2 could lose times saved on their journeys queuing to board onward Tube trains.

This Assembly further notes that Crossrail 2 has widespread regional benefits.   Some 40% of the transport benefits and 30% of the new housing will be delivered outside London.   This Assembly welcomes the work that has been done which shows that London can pay for 50% of the costs of the project.

This Assembly notes that no other infrastructure project tackles so many local and regional problems while boosting overall capacity on such a scale.  Crossrail 2 would increase London’s rail capacity by 10 per cent and support 200,000 additional new homes and 200,000 new jobs.  This Assembly believes Crossrail 2 would contribute to bringing forward the new homes this city needs.

This Assembly highlights the cross-party support for the project across the South East and believes the approval of Crossrail 2 will be a strong statement of confidence in London’s economy as we negotiate a new relationship with the European Union.   This Assembly therefore asks the Secretary of State for Transport to approve TfL’s Strategic Outline Business Case for Crossrail 2 without delay.”


Brighton line report due soon 1

The report into the rail infrastructure between London and Brighton announced by the previous chancellor will be released shortly.

Peter Kyle (Hove) (Lab)

A week before the election, the Chancellor’s predecessor came to Sussex and pledged support for infrastructure improvements to the rail line between London and Brighton. He commissioned ​a £100,000 study that has never been released. When will the Government release the south coast and London main line upgrade programme report?

Mr Philip Hammond

Shortly
Source: Hansard


Northern line TBMs dropped in

The precision operation required a huge 750-tonne crane to lift the two tunnel boring machines, Helen and Amy, in the shadow of London’s iconic Battersea Power Station.

The two tunnel boring machines will create two 3.2km underground tunnels to extend the Charing Cross branch of the Northern line from Kennington to Battersea Power Station, via Nine Elms Station. Tunnelling will take six months to complete. The extension, targeted for completion in 2020, is the first major Tube line extension since the Jubilee line in the late 1990s.

Both tunnelling machines will now be fully assembled within two 77m long launch tunnels, before starting their journeys towards Kennington next month. When fully assembled, Helen and Amy will each be 100 metres in length.

According to tunnelling tradition, the machines cannot start work until given a name and, following a vote by local school children, were named in honour of the first British astronaut, Helen Sharman, and British aviation pioneer, Amy Johnson, who was the first female pilot to fly solo from Britain to Australia.

After both tunnel boring machines and their gantries are constructed, a conveyor system will be built to take the spoil from the tunnels up to barges on the River Thames. More than 300,000 tonnes of earth will be excavated by Helen and Amy in this way before the spoil is taken to Goshems Farm in East Tilbury, Essex by boat where it will be used to create arable farmland.


Mayor warns of overcrowding without Crossrail 2

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, will today warn that the capital’s transport network will grind to a halt under the strain of overcrowding unless the Government backs plans for Crossrail 2.

His warning came as he revealed TfL modelling  shows that, without Crossrail 2, at least 17 Underground stations will buckle under crowding pressures and thousands of passengers arriving at Euston on HS2 phase 2 could lose time saved on their journeys as they will have to queue to board onward trains.

Without the new south west – north east connection Crossrail 2 provides into London’s transport network, the mayor will warn that Waterloo and Victoria mainline stations risk rush hour meltdown.

Improvements to the Tube network and the opening of the Elizabeth line (Crossrail 1) will provide extra capacity in the coming years, but they will not be enough to cope with the anticipated demand.

Sadiq will highlight the problem during a speech at the London Transport Museum’s annual fundraising dinner tonight in which he will warn that, without Crossrail 2, London will face daily closures at key stations and see time savings from the Government’s flagship HS2 line lost as a result of onward delays at Euston.

He will say that only by investing in Crossrail 2 will the transport network be able to cope, with the major project also playing a crucial role in unlocking the capital’s economic growth and delivering new affordable homes across London and the South East.

However, Crossrail 2 would increase the capital’s rail capacity by 10pc – bringing in an additional 270,000 people into central London each morning peak – cutting journey times, improving connections and accessibility. It would serve stations throughout the South East, linking south west and north east London, as well as Surrey and Hertfordshire, bringing more than 800 stations on the national rail network within just one interchange.

It would also support the regeneration and development of up to 200,000 new homes and 200,000 new jobs in London’s economy, as well as creating 18,000 jobs during construction and supporting a further 60,000 jobs nationwide through its supply chain – boosting the UK economy by tens of billions of pounds.

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said:

“Crossrail 2 is crucial. It’s crucial to meeting our ambitious targets for new affordable homes. It’s crucial to unlocking future economic growth in the aftermath of the EU referendum. It’s crucial to ensure that Euston station keeps running smoothly when HS2 opens, and it’s crucial if we are to prevent Waterloo, Victoria and many other stations from rush hour meltdown.

“Half the cost of the project can be met through funding from London, but we need the Government to meet the other half if we are to avoid this unbearable strain on our transport network. Crossrail 2 is the answer to help the entire country, because when London succeeds, Britain succeeds.”

TfL is preparing to submit a robust updated business case and funding plan to the Transport Secretary‎, who is due to make a decision on further Government support in the Spring. Construction could start in the early 2020s and the railway could be operational by 2033


Consultation opens into detailed Bakerloo line proposals

Bakerloo line extension map (c) TfL

The extension of the Bakerloo line moved closer today with the opening of a new Transport for London (TfL) consultation that sets out detailed proposals for station locations along the proposed route beyond Elephant & Castle.

The Bakerloo line extension, to Lewisham via Old Kent Road and New Cross Gate, is vital to meeting the needs of the Capital’s growing population, which is expected to increase from 8.7 million today to reach over 10 million by 2030. It would support growth in south east London through new housing, improved connectivity, increased transport network capacity and reduced journey times to key destinations including the West End and Lewisham town centre.

Working in collaboration with the local boroughs, Lewisham and Southwark, at least 25,000 new homes and 5,000 new jobs could be supported as a result of the Bakerloo line extension. Other benefits of the extension will include:

  • Extra capacity on London Underground for 65,000 journeys in the morning and evening peak, helping relieve congestion on local bus services and National Rail services
  • Relief of congestion on roads, reducing CO2 emissions and air pollution
  • An Underground train every two to three minutes between Lewisham and central London, with reduced journey times

Four new stations are being proposed along the route to boost connectivity and support regeneration. This includes two stations along Old Kent Road, one at New Cross Gate providing an interchange with London Overground and National Rail services, and one at Lewisham, providing an interchange with the DLR and National Rail services. Details for proposed locations of the ventilation shafts needed to support this extension also form part of this consultation.

The proposals also set out the need to undertake further capacity upgrade works to the Bakerloo line station at Elephant & Castle.

As announced in the TfL Business Plan, the updated plans bring the completion date of the extension forward by two years to 2028/29, to align with the timetable for the upgrade of the Bakerloo line.

The Mayor and TfL remain committed to delivering a second phase of the extension beyond Lewisham, and work is continuing to build a case for a second phase.

Sadiq Khan, Mayor of London, said:
`I’m delighted that we’re pushing ahead with the Bakerloo line extension two years earlier than originally planned. It will provide substantial benefits for thousands of Londoners, providing a new direct route for commuters into the heart of central London and joining up key transport links across south London.

`The extension also has huge potential for new jobs and 25,000 new homes in the area, helping fulfil our ambition to tackle London’s housing crisis and provide a substantial boost to the local economy.’

Sir Steve Bullock, Mayor of Lewisham, said: `A Bakerloo line extension to Lewisham would make it easier for our residents to travel around London and it would bring in much needed investment. Lewisham is growing fast and a Bakerloo line extension to this part of south London will help to support that growth in Lewisham and beyond.’

Cllr Mark Williams, cabinet member for regeneration and new homes at Southwark, said: `We have big ambitions for the Old Kent Road regeneration, which will pull central London further south and help transform the length of this historic thoroughfare into a dynamic new high street bustling with new homes, including at least 35 per cent affordable homes, new shops and cafes, workspaces, parks and open spaces and safer networks for cyclists and pedestrians.

`A key part of this is the Bakerloo line extension, making this part of London more open and accessible and encouraging investment.

“This is a very exciting opportunity and we are encouraging local people in particular to get involved in the conversations now to help shape the future of one of London’s most famous roads.’

Alex Williams, TfL’s Acting Managing Director of Planning, said:
`London continues to grow and we need to ensure transport has the capacity to accommodate this growth. The Bakerloo line extension plays an important part in these plans, improving connectivity for an area under-served by public transport where there is potential to support 25,000 new homes and 5,000 new jobs.’

The preferred route was chosen as it provides the greatest regeneration opportunities, and the best case for maximising new homes and jobs. Other options were considered for the extension, many of which were suggested as part of the previous public consultation.

TfL is planning to progress work towards an application for planning powers by 2020, with further public consultation expected in the future as more details about the proposals are developed.

The public consultation will run until 21st April and further information about the consultation and the questionnaire can be found at www.tfl.gov.uk/bakerloo-extension .